The Quotable AC/DC

November 20, 2020 2 min read

The Quotable AC/DC

To say 2020 has been a turbulent year is a bit of an understatement. Still, in these times of uncertainty, we’re heartened that AC/DC are providing some consistency.

The latest album, “Power Up”, delivers everything you expect from Australia’s greatest rock n’ roll export, and during these strange times, that familiarity is like a much-needed comfort blanket.

In celebration of AC/DC’s triumphant return, we’ve selected a few notable quotables from the band’s interviews over the years. Some offer insight into their creative process and inspiration, others reflect the band’s distinctive humour.

So, pour yourself a cold one, crank up “Power Up”, and read on!

Angus Young

“I'm sick to death of people saying we've made 11 albums that sound exactly the same, In fact, we've made 12 albums that sound exactly the same.”

“Every guitarist I would cross paths with would tell me that I should have a flashy guitar, whatever the latest fashion model was, and I used to say, 'Why? Mine works, doesn't it? It's a piece of wood and six strings, and it works.”

“I honestly believe that you have to be able to play the guitar hard if you want to be able to get the whole spectrum of tones out of it. Since I normally play so hard, when I start picking a bit softer my tone changes completely, and that's really useful sometimes for creating a more laid-back feel.”

Malcolm Young

“Rock bands don't really swing... a lot of rock is stiff. They don't understand the feel, the movement, you know, the jungle of it all.”

“If there was a wrong note, it didn't matter as long as it was rocking.”

“My brother John loved Big Bill Broonzy, and from that, Angus and I discovered Muddy Waters and Buddy Guy. We could relate to what they were singing about. When a family uproots itself and moves to the other side of the world because your dad couldn't get a job, you didn't feel part of the system, if there even was a system.”

Bon Scott

“No matter how long you play rock n roll songs might change just as the balls are there, the rock balls. And that's what's important to us.”

“I've never had a message for anyone in my entire life. Except maybe to give out my room number.”

“We just want to make the walls cave in and the ceiling collapse. Music is meant to be played as loudly as possible, really raw and punchy, and I'll punch out anyone who doesn't like it the way I do.”

Brian Johnson

“I'm an out and out basic man and AC/DC are one of the best rock'n'roll bands in the world, doing things just to the basics, you know.”

“People are famous for being famous and for nothing else. And good luck to them, because it lasts about a year and then they're nothing again.”


What is your favourite AC/DC moment? Have you listened to the new record? As always, share your stories in the comments. 



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