What is the One Gig You Wish You’d Seen?

October 28, 2021 2 min read

What is the One Gig You Wish You’d Seen?

Have you ever experienced “gig regret”? I know I have.

I’m not talking about gigs that you regret going to here (although I’ve got a fair few of those!). I’m talking about the gigs that you turned down the opportunity to go to, only to regret it later.

My biggest gig regret is Prince. I forewent the opportunity to see the Purple one and his entourage in concert on three separate occasions. Each time, I cited easily surmountable work commitments or travel issues and reasoned that “I’d get another chance” to see him in concert on the “next tour.”

When Prince died in 2016, I was gutted. Not just because we’d lost a musical legend, but because that “next tour” I’d been continually holding out for would never come.

While Prince is an artist that I feasibly could have seen, there are plenty of other “before my time” legendary artists that I wish I’d witnessed in concert.

Led Zeppelin immediately springs to mind. They’re probably my favorite band, and during my “teenage obsession” phase, I devoured countless live bootlegs from Messrs. Page, Plant, Jones and Bonham, vicariously experiencing some of their most notable performances in the process. How I wished I could have been at one of the legendary L.A. Forum shows from 1970 or 1977, witnessed that five-night stand at Earl’s Court from 1975 in the flesh, or taken in one of their magisterial gigs from the Japan 1971 tour in person.

Then there are those artists that I can still see live today, but wish I had witnessed in their imperial phase. To have seen the Stones in ’69 or ’72, supporting the releases of landmark albums like Let it Bleed and Exile on Main Street would be nothing short of exhilarating. Or to catch Dylan in the turbulent mid-1960s, on the cusp of electrifying his sound and completely changing the game.

Really, when it comes to gigs, I shouldn’t complain. I’ve been fortunate enough to witness hundreds of acts over the years, and I’ve witnessed many of my musical heroes in a concert setting. But still, that “what if” question always remains, and there’s some fun to be had speculating what could have been…

Which is where you all come in. We want to know: “what are the gigs that you wish you’d seen?” Whether it’s an instance of “gig regret,” an iconic band from before your time, or an act you never got to see in their prime, tell us your stories below. And, while you’re at it, let us know about the iconic gigs that you did see. Were you at a concert that’s gone down in the history books? One that was preserved on a famous live album or concert film? Or did you experience one of the great, unsung live shows that hasn’t yet made it into the history books? Let us know in the comments.



Also in Fingerboard Stories

When A Musician Visits Nashville
When A Musician Visits Nashville

January 26, 2024 5 min read

To walk into his store is a sight to behold. The walls are lined with instruments from various eras, from legacy brands like Fender and Gibson to instruments from uncommon makers such as Paoletti and Mervin Davis. The staff are also not shy about letting anyone try anything. Want to play the $20,000 1950s Stratocaster? Go ahead!
If You Have To Ask...
If You Have To Ask...

January 12, 2024 4 min read

Louis Armstrong once famously said, “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” Some will say that talking about music is like dancing about architecture. Jazz has undergone several phases over the years, from big band to bebop to fusion to fuzak (though the less said about that one, the better). Many common elements exist in these styles that help define them as jazz.
A Silent Night For Every Player
A Silent Night For Every Player

December 19, 2023 3 min read

One of the most popular, if not the most popular, songs of the holiday season, Silent Night, originated in 1818 in the Austrian village of Oberndorf. Joseph Mohr, the local parish priest, approached Franz Xaver Gruber, a school teacher and organist, with a poem he had written. On Christmas Eve, faced with a malfunctioning organ, Gruber composed a simple melody to accompany Mohr's verses (with a guitar, no less! How fitting for this blog!). The song was first performed on Christmas Eve in 1818 at the St. Nicholas Church in Oberndorf